FAST FACTS

Profession: Registered nurse (RN)

Years at UVA: 16 years

Where work at UVA: Palliative Care and Emergency Department

Previous Professional Experience: Phlebotomist, Kung Fu teacher, carpenter. B.A, Psychology from Canisius college, Master’s prepared work in Comparative Religion, Eastern Philosophy and Western Mysticism, Western Michigan University, BSN, D’Youville College

IN HIS WORDS

Q: What inspired you to join this profession?
A:  My brother died of glioblastoma when I was in my mid 20s.  I left grad school to be with him when he died and noticed that the hospital where he was did not have a strong hospice program. This experience led me to change my career goals - I decided that graduate school in comparative religion was not going to meet my need and I looked to other opportunities.  A career in nursing would offer me the capacity to practice much of what I had been studying while meeting the needs of patients and families at this time in their lives.

Q: What brings meaning to your work at this time?
A: My work gains relevancy when I am able to help relieve suffering by connecting with other human beings, hearing their stories and becoming part of their story. Though my nursing practice I find myself affecting their lives and being affected by their lives

Q: Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?
A: I’ve been a part of the Compassionate Care Initiative since its inception. I began training initially with Monica Sharma and Cynda Rushton using Monica Sharma’s model of transforming systems and much of the work I’ve been doing is based on that.   My practice includes The Pause, which has become nationally and even internationally known  and was based on that transformational model. I also work with the School of Nursing teaching resiliency to nursing students and giving them an introduction to the importance of resiliency and related practices. In the Emergency room we implemented “gorilla mindfulness” which included using mindfulness 5 minutes for brief periods randomly in the ER. In the community I found opportunities to promote mindfulness practice through programs like one at Feather Ridge Farm and most recently at Sunrise Trailer Park.

Q: How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?
A:  I’ve been doing the weekly Wednesday meditations for the past four years. I meditate with a group of people at the School of Nursing who make a commitment to meet at 6 a.m. for the practice of meditation.   I took on stick carving as a means of therapy for myself: I carve walking sticks and give them away. I used to carve sticks and keep them. I started giving them to people who needed canes and walking sticks so it became even more of an act of compassion because then my habit became something constructive as opposed to obstructive.

What is your profession?

Physician / Surgeon       

 

How many years have you served in this profession?

9 years

 

How many years have you been at UVA?

17 Years

 

Where do you currently work at UVA (unit/department)?

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine

What inspired you to join this profession?

I was inspired to become a trauma surgeon because of the close link between psychic pain, social disease, and severe injury. Being a practicing surgeon allows one to not just heal the external manifestations of social disease, but, also, to perform daily work in the amazing applied physiology lab, the surgical intensive care unit.  

 

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

Working on the psychic well-being of patients and providers gives meaning to my work that would not be as easily accessed through focused more exclusively on physical and physiologic disease.            

 

Feel free to share any specific information about your educational and professional background, such as other specialties or places you've worked, other degrees and careers, etc.?

In addition to working in the United States I also run a program in Eastern Africa to mentor surgical resident, students, and educators, in Rwanda.

      

Tell us about your interests and/or any projects that you're working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

I am currently working on multiple projects to assess the well-being in the surgical intensive care unit, in prehospital providers in our region, and in acute care nurses and technicians. In addition, I'm currently developing small group psycho-education pilots to assist healthcare workers who have found themselves injured as a result of their personal life and professional work. Eventually, I would like to see broad organizational education regarding the manner in which healthcare providers can support one another, and provide buddy-care.           

 

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in your work and life, in general?

I currently have a daily spiritual practice that includes prayer, meditation, and reflective writing. In addition, I'm committed to mindful eating and frequent exercise. Above all, I seek to be deeply engaged in my personal life and community.

Profession:

Nurse Clin III, CCRN, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology certified.

How many years have you served in this profession?

12 years

How many years have you been at UVA?

10 years

Where do you currently work at UVA (unit/department)?

PICU

What inspired you to join this profession?

After having a child in the hospital for an extended length of time I decided there was a calling for me. I know how it feels to be a powerless parent, I can relate to families when they have to put all their trust in the healthcare team and just hope that they have your child's best interest at heart.  

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

Knowing that I can make a difference. My job is very rewarding, and I feel so blessed to be able to do what I do. In the PICU we see everything. We have seen children minutes away from death receive a heart transplant and bounce back to life. We see miracles every day, seeing these miracles brings meaning to my work.      

Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

Currently I am working on the resiliency room project in the children's hospital as well as a nursing support group and collaboration activities within the children's hospital.        

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?

Keeping a healthy work life balance is key. I love to paint which is a great stress reliever for me.

Zoie is a recent transplant from Washington state where she grew up and competed her undergrad in environmental science from Western Washington University. Having always been drawn to different walks of life, after completing her degree, she traveled extensively throughout the US, Canada, Mexico and Central America. She was involved for many years in grassroots environmental and social justice work in her community and continues to bring this awareness into her work in the medical field.

What is your profession?

Patient Care Assistant on 5E, and Yoga Instructor

How many years have you served in this profession?

1 year as a CNA and 3 years as a yoga instructor

How long have you been at UVA?

Two months

Where do you work at UVA (unit/department)?

5 East, Inpatient Psychiatry

What inspired you to join this profession?

Ever since completing my undergraduate degree I have become increasingly drawn towards work in social services centered around emotional and mental health. From being an advocacy counselor for survivors of domestic and sexual violence to establishing a yoga program for Indigenous women and girls in Guatemala; my path has been one of helping others to heal.

I became a CNA as a stepping stone to becoming a nurse. I wanted to continue helping people and get my feet wet in the medical field. I had worked as a caregiver when I was younger but it took more life-experience to become truly prepared to enter into a field with such emotional demands such as psychiatric-mental health. However, through my own personal and spiritual work, it become clear that this was the next step for me in helping the world find peace.

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

As CNAs, we are on the front line, working directly with each patient. Forming intimate and safe relationships with patients is ultimately what gives my work meaning in this time. Many of our patients, and especially the elderly population may have no family or people who are part of their lives other than their health care providers. For me being one of the few people there at the end of a person's long life has been a true honor. The gratitude I have experienced from a patient who I have helped, or their families, even in some small way, is always a wonderful gift of this work.

When leading yoga on whether on the unit or in the community, there is a divine moment when you hear your patients really be in their breath. To see a face change from worry to joy over the course of an hour of their own work and effort has been one of the greatest benefit for me in providing this tool to others.

 

What are some interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

As a certified yoga instructor, I’m able to lead yoga groups on the inpatient psychiatric unit. My classes are centered around love and compassion for self and others as well as providing a safe space for people to come into their body and breath. This setting can be challenging for providers as well, so being able to provide some active listening and appreciation to my coworkers for what they do I think helps create a culture I’d like to see in a hospital setting.

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?

Yoga, meditation, and vegetables. Every Day. Even if I only hit the mat for 5 minutes, I make a point to do so before going to bed. It is also important for me to be outside and put my bare feet on some Earth. I interact with a lot of machines every day, so also taking some time to be with animals is helpful for coming back to a grounded place.

FAST FACTS

Profession: Registered Nurse and IBCLC (Lactation Consultant)

Years in Profession: RN for 30 years, IBCLC for 10 years

Years at UVA: 22 years

Location of Current Profession at UVA: The Women and Children’s Hospital

Previous Professional Experience: Worked throughout the hospital in PICU, NICU, MICU, SICU, and acute floors for pediatrics and adults

Educational Background: Graduated from college in 1985 and became an RN and did self-study to achieve IBCLC in 2005

What inspired you to join this profession?

It was 1981, I was fresh out of high school and still a teenager. The world was open to me. What did I want to do? I had a big heart, open mind, I was creative, passionate, and no idea what direction to go. I was encouraged to enter the field of nursing by my teachers, parents, and friends. They saw something, they would say, “You would be a great nurse.” At the time I wasn’t so sure and my vision of a nurse was that of someone who fit very nicely into a tidy prescribed role. I felt creative, young and wide open. I felt that nursing might feel limiting, but since I didn’t have another plan I enrolled in a one year program for my LPN. I rationalized that if I didn’t like nursing I could do something different after a year and I would have my LPN for finding temporary work. So I traded my tie-dyes and flip flops for white hose and a nurse’s cap. Our first clinical was in a nursing home. On the first day – after my first encounter with my 100 year-old patient Sadie McGee – I knew in my core that I was a nurse. I was able to help maintain dignity of those more vulnerable. I was put in a position of trust. My actions built my confidence and self-worth. I was able to care easily with empathy, humor, energy, and tenderness. The more I gave, the stronger I felt.

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

Relationships. I continue to feel the grace after 30 years in the profession of caring for others. I thrive on educating, calming, and supporting others. Mainly I work with new mothers and new fathers alongside their infants in the NICU. New parents are distracted. Add to the distraction hormone shifts, a critically ill infant, and you find yourself in a very delicate situation. Mothers often feel guilty for not “protecting” their baby from early delivery, genetic disorder, or birth defect. It is not a rational guilt in most cases, but it is real. Enter the nurse that is here to help you become successful with providing colostrum to your tiny sick infant. (Something that your baby’s doctors are saying is important). Parents have no idea how to navigate this journey to become successful at helping their baby. I find it meaningful to build a trusting relationship where families seek support openly and feel encouraged and supported.

Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

End of life issues are some of the most challenging and meaningful encounters we as healthcare providers have with families. I have seen that certain nurses and doctors feel drawn to engage with families who are suffering loss. Other team members admittedly feel unsure about what to say, or what to do. These health care professionals tend to allow those who are more comfortable to step up and care for the grieving families. In addition we have received feedback from grieving families that once they left UVA there was nothing offered for supporting their ongoing grief process. I partnered with Joy Miller our Pediatric Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner and began planning a Perinatal and Infant Loss Support Group for families. In order to train nurses interested in becoming skillful to facilitate such a group, we brought Done Dei, MSN, RN, Nurse Consultant, to hold a full day lecture on May 12, 2015, titled Bereavement Support Training for Health Care Professionals. This training was open to all health care providers (free to UVA employees) and invitations were sent to other hospitals, schools, and organizations. I am hoping that this training will expand our institutional comfort zone and staffs' personal resiliency and compassion when caring for parents and families suffering a most devastating loss.

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?

I am supported by the G.R.A.C.E. model for patient encounters. This is very grounding when I need a reminder, especially when I feel the edges fray from stress. G – Gather Attention. R - Remember Intention. A - Attune to patient and self. C - Consider options. E – Enact. I cannot rush through my patient encounters. I am in a role that requires me to pull up a chair and get the story. I hear the whole story, the story that involves the other children, pets, extended family, and more. This moment with these families represents a time in their life with great impact on all of those around them. I feel privileged to be part of their circle of support.

Profession: Registered Dietician

How many years have you been at UVA?

Five years

Where do you currently work at UVA (unit/department)?

Kidney Center

Background:

Mark Twain once said, "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime." I learned this quote after I lived abroad doing various jobs and once a Peace Corps volunteer. I never intended for my travels and experiences to make me more compassionate or open-minded; it just did. And now I am dedicated to the cause. 

What inspired you to become an Ambassador?

I am interested in starting a program in the Kidney Center and in learning what other departments are doing to foster compassionate care.

What inspired you to join this profession?

An interview I heard on public radio.

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

I enjoy helping patients navigate a very difficult diet that will allow them to live more comfortably. In addition to dietary information, I want patients to know that I am an advocate for them through their very difficult disease.

Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

Initially I would like to start a dialogue with our staff about what would allow them to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion. Thereafter, and, based on the results, I would be interested in helping to maintain those supports.

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?

I am intentional about what I eat and who I spend time with. I am very serious about my sleep hygiene so that I can be well rested and, therefore, have energy for a high need population. I make time for exercise and space and time to be alone so that I can replenish and continue to give on a daily basis.

FAST FACTS

Profession: Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Years at UVA: 8 years

Where work at UVA: Pediatric Palliative Care Support

Previous Professional Experience: B.S Health Sciences, James Madison University, BSN, Seton Hall University, MSN University of Virginia, Student Assistant in Sociology and Anthropology during undergraduate years

IN HER WORDS

Q: What inspired you to join this profession?
A: I always knew I wanted to work with kids and I was so interested in the service aspect and relationship building with children and families. Even throughout nursing school when I was on different rotations other than pediatrics, I always came back to the resilience I saw in children and families.

Q: What brings meaning to your work at this time?
A: Witnessing the journey with each different family and just being present and serving them-- wherever they are in that process. For these really medically complex and fragile children and the families who are facing limiting and life-threatening diseases and illnesses, it is important that the health professional serve as a consistent form of support. A lot of people say “I don’t know how you do what you do”. I think this area of work was a calling to me, and I’m so fortunate to be able to witness these careful, thoughtful, loving decisions that these families are making about their child’s course and care.

Q: Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?
A: I’ve implemented a “check-in” with my staff that I try to do at every family meeting. It has been a really small step in validating the feelings that my staff has about approaching difficult topics. Hopefully in the spirit of resiliency and supporting each other, if we know someone is feeling anxious or overwhelmed before the meeting then we can come from a space of support and try and help them through it.

Q: How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?
A: My work requires that I essentially ask families and children to borrow strength from me. I have a lot of support from my husband and also just my peers and colleagues in the hospital. Being outside, exercising and travelling are things that bring me a lot of peace and allows me to refill my tank so that I feel whole and strong. I also find time to journal.  Resiliency can be different and challenging, but I definitely have a lot of supportive friends and family who help keep my life in balance.

Profession: Registered Dietitian- RDN, Certified Diabetes Educator-CDE, Duke-certified Integrative Health Coach, manager of outpatient nutrition services at UVA

Years at Profession: Since 1978

Years at UVA: 10 years

Location of Current Profession at UVA: Northridge at the Nutrition Counseling Center and the Primary, Specialty and Integrative Medicine practice in Pantops. Sometimes conduct offsite classes. I’m also part time faculty at Georgetown in their Health Coaching certificate program.

Previous Professional Experience: Lots! I’ve worked in many areas of the field of nutrition: inpatient nutrition, school age obesity research, geriatrics, with resort retirement, in teaching hospitals as the director of clinical nutrition/chief clinical RD; in the premier resort in West Virginia/the Greenbrier where I partnered with chefs to create the first 5-star spa and 5-star resort vegetarian cuisine, nutritionist at the Greenbrier clinic; nutrition faculty for 3 medical schools and University of Maryland Baltimore County, senior nutritionist at the Joslin Diabetes Center affiliated with the University of Maryland Medicine, Integrative Medicine Clinic at UMMS.

Educational Background:

Traditional: BA- food & nutrition at San Diego State University; MS-nutrition science at University of California, Davis; dietetic internship at Medical College of Virginia; counseling and pastoral counseling graduate classes at Loyola University in Maryland and Beckley, West Virginia; Integrative Health Coach certification at Duke.

Non-Traditional: Yoga training at Integral Yoga, Medical Yoga, Yoga & Stress Management; meditation teacher training at Ananda; training for 15 years to offer EBT-Emotional Brain Training to others; workshops or 5 day trainings in functional nutrition/medicine, phoenix rising yoga therapy, Harvard Mind-Body Institute, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Wellness Inventory, botanical medicine.

What inspired you to join this profession?

I became a nutritionist after seeing the effects on health that diet changes and meditative lifestyle changes could bring to mental health and physical health. I became a CDE when I realized that this form of self-care was well researched and medically supported, and that insurers even saw the wisdom in diabetes self- management training. Hearing Laurel Mellin PhD, RD speak on The Solution Method (today’s EBT/Emotional Brain Training) helped me realize these were the missing people about getting the feeling and thinking brain to cooperate for health change.

What brings meaning to your work at this time?

It’s a joy to have certainty that dis-ease can be reversed and to have partnered with thousands of people over a long career to observe or facilitate subtle and dramatic health enhancements and a deepening quality of life. Currently seeing that this is the time I and others have been waiting for when the confluence of many preventive, traditional and integrative practices support the web of health enhancement and recovery.

Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?

I’ve had the pleasure of offering EBT-Emotional Brain Training, a 6 week training, to employees at UVA since 2006, for the last several years as a tuition covered expense through Hoo’s Well. We expose our dietetic interns to mindfulness activities, mindful eating, EBT, etc.

How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?

I do creative things like offering the Moving Beyond Ordinary Wellness: Full Spectrum Wellness Event in partnership with a local facility and the CCI. I practice journaling, gratitude, yoga, walking, contra dancing and EBT.

Profession: Registered Nurse (RN)

Where Work at UVA: Stem Cell Transplant Unit and 8 West

Previous Professional Experience: I currently chair the Caring Hands Committee. I was a counselor at Region Ten for many years and also worked in Asia with the destitute and dying

What is your profession?

I'm a hematology/oncology RN.  I work primarily on the Stem Cell Transplant Unit.

 

What inspired you to be a nurse?

I realized that nursing provided the perfect marriage of providing compassionate care, of being continually challenged to learn more, and of meeting and working with a variety of people in a variety of situations. Before nursing, I worked for years as a counselor at Region Ten, working first with the intellectually disabled and then with dual diagnosis clients who had been recently homeless. I loved these roles and realized that with nursing I could continue to help people deal with life's challenges and transitions while continuing to further challenge myself. Years ago, when I was traveling in Asia, I also had the opportunity of working with the dying and destitute, and these experiences left a deep impression upon me.  I continue to be inspired to serve in a way that stretches both my heart and my mind.

 

What motivated you to become a part of the CCI?

I am a strong proponent of CCI's mission. While so many nurses are amazingly compassionate toward their patients and fellow healthcare workers, many times these same nurses can learn to be decidedly more kind, supportive and compassionate toward themselves. I realize that this is very true for me. As we all know, healthcare workers work in a high stress environment; I am motivated to seek to bring more ease, more joy, and more resilience to myself and my colleagues. I am also honored to be among such an amazing and inspiring group of caregivers.

 

What goals do you have for implementing the CCI mission in the University Community?

On 8 West and Stem Cell we are in the process of implementing bi-monthly "Compassionate Care Restorative Tea Time." This initiative has been warmly received and supported by our management. I am also planning to offer mindfulness and gratitude sessions at the beginning of these teas, and I am hoping to have other CCI members bring their gifts and insights to 8 West and the Stem Cell Transplant Unit. 

 

What goals do you have for implementing the CCI mission in your professional role?

As chair of the "Caring Hands" committee I try to support my co-workers. I also try to notice nurses or other caregivers who are struggling, to see if there is some way I can support them. I am interested in getting our floor more interested in resiliency exercises and in attending CCI events.  


How do you stay resilient?

I most fully restore myself by playing and laughing with my children Bodhi and Sophia. I am making a commitment to meditate more regularly, and this has been very helpful. I love to hike, camp, watch silly comedies and read inspiring literature. I try to find co-workers I can fully share and process life's challenges with. On several occasions on 8 West we have had the chaplain support us with grieving the many transitions we regularly face, and I have found these sessions very helpful. I continually discover that laughter is truly the best medicine.

 

FAST FACTS

Profession: Licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) since 1995

Years at UVA: 6 years

Where work at UVA: Charles Strickler Transplant Center

Previous Professional Experience:
19 years in private psychotherapy practice, faculty member at The Rubenfeld Synergy Center teaching mind-body skills to clinicians, and program manager of the Wellness Recovery Center. 

Education: MSW Clinical Concentration from Virginia Comonwealth University; B.S., Family, Management, and Community Development from University of Maryland, College Park.

Institudes: Upaya Zen Center Being With Dying program, Santa Fe, NM; Center for Mind-Body Medicine, Washington, D.C.; Temenos Institute for Jungian Theory and Practice, Frederick, MD; Gestalt Psychotherapy Center, Washington, D.C.; Rubenfeld Syngergy Center for Mind-Body Psychotherapy, New York, NY.

IN HER WORDS

Q: What inspired you to join this profession?
A: I volunteered at Second Mile Home for Runaway Youth when I was in high school.  I was inspired by dedicated staff members who worked together to make differences in the lives of young people.

Q: What brings meaning to your work at this time?
A: When people share their stories and their burdens and can feel my understanding and compassion, I know that I have made a difference.

Q: Tell me about your interests and/or any projects that you’re working on to foster a culture of resiliency and compassion in your work setting?
A: I work with staff members who don’t have a background in mental health on how to respond to patients who are experiencing a mental health crisis.  When staff are able to respond effectively and compassionately, it reduces their stress and compassion fatigue.  Since stress is one of the reasons many people turn to poor ways of coping, I created a handout on free online resources to reduce stress.  Additionally, I’ve been influenced by Upaya’s Being With Dying program and have become more involved in end of life care issues.

Q: How do you take care of yourself and stay resilient with the many challenges in healthcare today?
A: I love being outdoors as much as I can, whether it is walking my dog or hiking nature trails.  I practice yoga, meditation, and drumming regularly.  I talk and laugh with friends every day.  When I have challenging cases at work, I consult with my colleagues. 

Gene Donovan is in his final year of the Clinical Nurse Leader Program. His undergraduate degree in science and the following years in the world of trade crafts, offered him a chance to consider and experience how there is space for both medicine and compassion when providing care.

What inspired you to pursue nursing?

As I considered my aspirations, I became increasingly aware of the choices that had led me to where I was, and what those choices meant for where I should go. I had often chosen occupations bringing me in community with others. Learning and sharing with others was often at the core of my desire to work. In contrast, there were other opportunities that were isolating but allowed for moment to moment pointedness.  The time and focus necessary in crafting wood or metal was freeing in its dedication to precision, while the time and focus necessary for serving others was rewarding in its dedication to interaction. Nursing, after much consideration and a plethora of experiences, was the right combination of in the moment precision and rewarding interaction.

 

What motivated you to become a Student Ambassador for the Compassionate Care Initiative?

I have become increasingly aware of the analogous nature between care and advice. If it is a goal to offer truly meaningful advice you must understand that person and have experienced the issue at hand in a way that allows you to give a part of yourself to another. I think that quality care follows that paradigm closely in requiring one to care for themselves if they have an intention of offering an honest compassion to another. I believe that the strategies and practices offered through the CCI are integral in creating healthy communities.

 

What goals do you have for implementing CCI's mission in the University Community?

It is my goal to learn and practice compassionate care with myself and those I have the honor to treat. It is my hope that the care provided in its mindful nature will allow others to better care for themselves and share that health with others.

 

How do you stay resilient?

I believe that I find my resilience in engagement. Whether it be hiking, playing music or sports, watching movies or playing board games. I find strength and calm when I commit to the momentary experience and forget what has been done as well as what needs to be done.

Rob Abbott is a Medical Student in the Class of 2017. He was inspired to pursue clinical care because he desired to bear witness the breadth of human experience. he strives to live his life as a "reflective human being" working with fellow compassionate healers at U.Va. He desires to promote the values of resiliency and holistic, compassionate care during his clinical training as a medical student. He also has a dedicated self-care practice involving a personal (at home) daily yoga practice,  meditation practice all interspersed with a variety of dynamic reflective micro-practices.

What inspired you to pursue clinical care?                                      

In witnessing the breadth of human experience, from tremendous joy to overwhelming suffering in both my early medical work as an emergency room scribe to my typical day to day life as a reflective human being, I have come to realize that my calling in medicine resides in cultivating a space where others can heal and ultimately return to the greater wholeness that is their true being.

 

What motivated you to become a Student Ambassador for the Compassionate Care Initiative?               

I have joined the CCI out of a deep desire to work with some of the most inspiring and (com)passionate healers at U.Va., knowing that it doesn't take just a typical “village” to raise a child or to heal one of its ill members, but a “village”  of people genuinely dedicated to providing for others in whatever way that will nourish their soul.

 

What goals do you have for implementing the CCI mission in the University Community? 

I plan to promote the values of resiliency and holistic, compassionate care during my clinical training as a medical student and actively hold a space for reflective self-practice through meditation and inter-disciplinary discussion among all members at U.Va. and the surrounding community.

 

How do you stay resilient?

I have a dedicated self-care practice involving a personal (at home) daily yoga practice, a once to twice weekly meditation practice all interspersed with a variety of dynamic reflective micro-practices or exercises involving gratitude, affirmation and positive intention.